Blue Mountains in One Day

Posted on: 18/06/2019

Blue mountains

When to visit: year round, though Autumn is best for walking

In its entirety, the Blue Mountains region covers 11,000 square kilometres of New South Wales, the majority of which is covered by a World Heritage listing. It would take quite some time to see everything the national park has on offer, but you're sure to be floored by it beauty regardless of which area you choose to explore. And to add a little extra motivation for a trip to the Blueys, there are plenty of caravan parks and walking trails sprinkled around each of the main attractions, making it an easy trip for those new to caravanning.

New South Wales Supermap UnlaminatedNew South Wales Supermap
Outdoor Light Pack
Outdoor Light Pack
HX-1 Navigator
HX-1 Navigator
Camps Australia Wide 10
Camps Australia Wide 10

 three-sister-katoomba-NSW

The Three Sisters is perhaps the most recognisable rock feature in the whole of the Blue Mountains. Just two and a half kilometres out of Katoomba, it's an easy drive for any vehicle and boasts a number of breathtaking lookouts along the way. The Katoomba Cascades and Gordon Falls are also well worth checking out, particularly if you're fond of a walk.

Jenolan Caves is the oldest limestone cave network in the world, dating back around 340-million years. For a small entrance fee visitors can explore sections of the peaceful subterranean caverns. Once you've experienced the serene wonder of the place, it's easy to understand how the local Gundungurra Aboriginal people believed that water from these caves held curative powers.

Zig Zag Railway at Lithgow

The recently redeveloped Scenic Railway has won a number of awards for its tourism and engineering qualities, and is one of the most memorable family activities in the Blue Mountains. The railway descends 310 metres at a 52 degree incline, vanishing into a cliff-side tunnel before re-emerging into the ancient forest.

Grand Canyon Walk

There's an almost endless supply of world-class hiking trails throughout the region, including the popular Mount Solitary, Grand Canyon, Prince Henry Cliff, Lawson Waterfalls, Red Hands cave and Ruined Castle. Or, if you'd like to try something adventurous, the blue mountains is also home to some of the country's finest mountain biking, rock climbing, canyoning and canoeing.

Note:

Roughly 10 per cent of New South Wales flora and fauna classified as threatened can be found in the Blue Mountains, be sure to tread lightly.