Attractions & Things To Do in The Kimberley

As one of the world's largest and most diverse off-road regions, the Kimberley delivers adventure travellers an endless supply of amazing locations to discover. To help you plan the ultimate Kimberley adventure, here's our list of the very best destinations on offer in the wild Kimberley.
Adventure Pack
Adventure Pack
4WD Pack
4WD Pack
Atlas & Guide
Atlas & Guide
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Paper Map

Mitchell Falls

Mitchell Falls, Kimberley

Mitchell Falls drops in four tiers with a total height of 80m, and makes a dramatic sight when the Mitchell River is running strongly. View this stunning remote feature with 3km walk from the camping area to the top of the falls or as part of a helicopter scenic fly over.

Wolfe Creek Crater

Wolfe Creek Crater

The Wolfe Creek meteorite crater, which measures about 880m across and over 60m deep, is an amazing sight.  Unknown to western science until 1947, when it was spotted by geologists on an aerial survey and is today one of the Kimberley's greatest attractions.

 

Bungle Bungles

Bungle Bungles

No tour of the Kimberley could be complete without a visit to the Bungle Bungle Range, the main feature in the 240,000 ha Purnululu National Park. The range includes thousands of sandstone ‘beehive’ towers that make up one of Australia’s most distinctive landscapes.

Cape Leveque

Cape Leveque Kooljaman

Cape Leveque mashes together vibrant red dirt with azure oceans along its majestic coastline. With plenty of dusty tracks to drive and coastal camping, Cape Leveque is one of the most unique and visually stunning regions in Australia.

Windjana Gorge

Windjana Gorge

Fissured grey-and-orange cliffs up to 90m high create a spectacular landmark. Nowhere else in the Kimberley are the deposits that make up an ancient reef as well exposed as it is here. Windjana Gorge is 3.5km long and has been carved through the Napier Range by floodwaters of the Lennard River.

Tunnel Creek Cave

Tunnel Creek Cave

Located 35km from Windjana Gorge, the tiny Tunnel Creek National Park is centred on an underground passage that has been eroded beneath the limestone range by Tunnel Creek. The Tunnel Cave is about 750m long and 3-12m high, and you can walk all the way through it from one side of the Napier Range to the other.

Geikie Gorge, Fitzroy River

Geikie Gorge, Fitzroy River

Geikie Gorge is a long, 30m-deep passage that has been carved through the junction of the Geikie and Oscar ranges by floodwaters of the Fitzroy River. Geikie Gorge is about 21km from Fitzroy Crossing and is one of only two national parks in the Kimberley that is accessible by sealed roads.

Bell Gorge

Bell Gorge

Accessible from a moderately difficult walking trail, Bell Gorge is an idyllic location. After the walk brings you to the top of the falls, you can get to the plunge pool - where you can swim - by following the markers over the ridge on the far side of the falls.

Horizontal Waterfall

Horizontal Falls the Kimberley

The setting for this unusual phenomenon is a narrow gap at the mouth of a large inlet in the Buccaneer Archipelago. At high tide the inlet fills, and as the tide turns, the water begins to drain out through the gap. During spring tides the rate at which the water is able to escape from the inlet cannot keep pace with the falling tide, so a horizontal waterfall is produced.

El Questro

El Questro, Blanco Lookout View

El Questro Wilderness Park is full of must-do activities: head out on a boating trip through Chamberlain Gorge, walk through El Questro Gorge or soak in a thermal pool at Zebedee Springs. The park itself is situated in the heart of the Kimberley, but its self-contained nature makes it an experience all on its own. Image: Branco's Lookout.

Gantheaume Point, Cable Beach

Gantheaume Point looking north

A promontory at the southern end of Cable Beach, Gantheaume Point is known for its ragged red cliffs, white beaches and views out to the Indian Ocean. Head to the point for a more secluded beachside experience than Cable Beach, the extra effort to reach it made worthwhile once you 

Dimond Gorge

Dimond Gorge

Amongst a region inundated with special places, Dimond Gorge is an impressive sight. Its proximity to Mornington Wilderness Camp and the Gibb River Road makes it one of the most popular sights to visit, which also means the drive in and out is an experience all on its own.

Mirima (Hidden Valley) National Park

Mirima (Hidden Valley) National Park

The sandstone formations in Mirima National Park are very like those of the Bungle Bungles, albeit smaller – if you aren’t going to Purnululu you can get some idea of what you’re missing by visiting Mirima. The park has four short walking tracks.

Keep River National Park

Keep River National Park

Covering 700 square-kilometres of often spectacular sandstone country, Keep River National Park neighbours the WA/NT border. One of the park’s main attractions is a high red escarpment where giant, beehive-like towers of stratified sandstone are reminiscent of the famous Bungle Bungles.

Barnett River Gorge

Barnett River Gorge

Barnett River Gorge is a pretty spot with deep pools and abundant bird life. The walking trails are excellent, and you can camp, although there are some other (quieter) camping spots down side tracks before you reach the gorge.

Lennard River Gorge, King Leopold Ranges

King Leopold Ranges

Accessed by a rough 4WD track that turns off the main road 13km past Sandfly Glen, this beautiful spot features a seasonal waterfall, deep shaded pools and tall cliffs. A series of small stone cairns indicates the steep and rocky route down to the water.

Lake Arygle

Lake Argyle

Australia’s largest artificial lake was created in 1972 by the damming of the Ord River. There are great early-morning and late-afternoon views of the northern end of the lake and its islands from the lookout above the dam wall.

Queen Victoria's Head, Napier Range

Napier Range Queen Victoria rock formation

A part of the Napier Range reaching north from the Gibb River Road, Queen Victoria's Head is a rock formation that has an eerily similar appearance to its royal namesake.

Cathedral Gorge

Cathedral Gorge

Situated with Purnululu National Park in the Bungle Bungle Ranges, Cathedral Gorge is an awe-inspiring natural amphitheatre of red rock that can be reached by a 3km walk.

Mini Palm Springs Gorge

Mini Palm Springs Gorge

Find yourself in a deep gorge with sheer cliff faces either side of you in Mini Palm Springs Gorge, accessible by a boulder-strewn walking track that is packed with Livistona palms.

China Wall, Duncan Road

China Wall, Duncan Road

The China Wall is a sub-vertical vein of quartz that protrudes from the hillside just outside of Halls Creek on the edge of the Kimberley. This natural phenomenon is hard to miss when passing by.

Halls Creek

Palm Springs Off Duncan Road

Sitting on the edge of the Kimberley and just south of the Bungle Bungles, Halls Creek is a touchpoint for an abundance of off-road adventures, while also holding its own fair share of historical significance and nearby attractions.

Saw Tooth Gorge, Duncan Road

Saw Tooth Gorge Off Duncan Road

Saw Tooth (Sawpit) Gorge features red walls that reflect in a desert pool where flocks of birds come to drink. It's a picturesque spot on the Black Elvire River suitable for swimming (in the early Dry) and picnicking.

Beach at Barn Hill Station

Coast at Barn Hill Station

A short walk from the Barn Hill Station homestead is a stunning stretch of coast. This remote coastal area is readily accessible to the would-be angler, camper and caravanner by dirt road off the highway.

James Price Point

James Price Point

James Price Point is a headland in Cape Leveque north of Broome. Featuring ample camping options, travellers can stand atop the red pindan cliffs of this remote coastline and stare out at the vast grandeur of the Indian Ocean.

Manning Gorge

Manning Gorge the Kimberley

Manning Gorge is an idyllic stop along the Gibb River Road near Mt Barnett Roadhouse. Stay at the camping area and then take the hour-or-more hike to the gorge to experience the breathtaking tranquility of this Kimberley gem.

Emma Gorge

Emma Gorge the Kimberley

The shaded water of Emma Gorge is reputed to be the coldest water in the Kimberley, though that doesn't stop travellers dipping into its chilly depths. The gorge is situated within El Questro Wilderness Park, and has luxury safari tents nearby for those after a touch of comfort.

Adcock Gorge

Adcock Gorge

A deep green pool fed by a gentle multi-tiered waterfall is the main attraction of Adcock Gorge. Tall rock walls give the gorge an element of secrecy, making it a recommended stop for those traversing the Gibb,

Wunnamurra Gorge

Wunnumurra Gorge

Within Mount Elizabeth Station - a working cattle station that offers a peek into outback life - is the inimitable Wunnamurra Gorge. Accessed from a rough and rocky 4WD track, the gorge features a sandy bank and well-fed waterfall to delight visitors. 

Dillie Gorge

Dillie Gorge

Within the Charnley River region is Dillie Gorge, one of the Kimberley's lesser-known gems that's located about an hour off the Gibb River Road.

Sir John Gorge

Sir John Gorge the Kimberley

Sir John Gorge is an expansive section of the Fitzroy River close to Mornington Wilderness Camp, its far bank positioned perfectly to catch fire at sunset, bringing the gorge to life in a fiery visual display.

Mertens Falls

Mertens Falls the Kimberley Mitchell Plateau

Mitchell Falls is not the only stunning waterfall on the Mitchell River Plateau, as Mertens and Little Mertens Falls will attest. You can walk to or fly over the falls as part of a scenic flight tour of the plateau.